Luxury Coach & Transportation

August 2019

Magazine for the professional limousine, charter and tour industry.

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32 LUXURY COACH & TRANSPORTATION AUGUST 2019 WWW.LCTMAG.COM Experts Advice Knowledgable Success Safety & Financial Audits I Cost Savings Growth Strategies I Negotiations Product Knowledge I DOT Compliance Improving Your Bottom Line Tom Holden Business Guru tom@BUSadvisors.org Keith Johnson CDS, CSI, CDI Regulatory Consultant keith@BUSadvisors.org 980-999-8484 • www.BUSadvisors.org Results are Just a Phone Call Away! MOTORCOACH / AWARDS are able to offer about 90% of our drivers full-time work with a full benefits pack- age, which I think is very attractive to potential candidates," he says. Part of that business portfolio includes fixed-route intercity service connected to rural public transit feeder services. Jefferson launched one of the nation's first rural transit feeder systems in Iowa during the 1980s. Today, the company has about 10 such contracts around its 14-state network and has played an important role in supporting multimodal transporta- tion in the cities they serve. In fact, Woelfel believes motorcoach compa- nies can play a key role in multimodal networks nationwide. "If you think about it, the motor- coach is not only the most environ- mentally-friendly and safest mode of transportation, but it is also the most flexible," he says. "Airplanes, trains, and other modes of transportation have a fixed area where they can operate, but when you are looking at ways to stitch all modes of transpor- tation together, I think the motor- has helped reduce the frequency of avoidable accidents by more than 50%. e driving school continues to help the company as it deals with the industry-wide issue of recruiting and retaining drivers. Woelfel explains its driver training program, which includes customer service and Smith's System training, enables them to only hire potential candidates who are the best fit for the company. "We are a bit picky, but if we find somebody we think is the best person for the job but may not necessarily have the driving experience we need, we are confident our team can work with them to give them the tools they need to become a safe driver," he says. While Jefferson, like most operators, faces the challenge of a driver short- age, Woelfel says the company has seen a consistent flow of candidates thanks to a full suite of recruitment tools, including digital targeted mar- keting campaigns. One edge Jefferson has over competitors is the ability to offer steady work, he says. "Because of our business portfolio, we what they are doing to score so well, and vice versa. e company uses a cloud-based platform that allows it to view those KPIs and other critical business mea- sures easily so it can make changes more nimbly, he adds. It also shares that information with employees on video screens around the office. Developing Professional Drivers Over its 100 years, Jefferson Lines has been an innovator in the industry, including being one of the first com- panies to carry insurance policies up to $200,000 to demonstrate its com- mitment to passenger safety in 1922; originating time schedules for buses in 1942; and piloting the usage of diesel engines as a way to reduce fuel usage and prolong the life of the engine in the mid-1940s. One highly successful improvement was the creation of a professional driv- ing school in 1979. Since then, Jefferson has trained over 6,500 drivers for public agencies, corporations, and other bus carriers, and according to one study,

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